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NAIDOC
Posted by Byron Movement on 2012-11-09 11:27:06.0

Last week NAIDOC has been celebrated throughout the country. On Thursday the community gathered at the Byron beachfront to pay respect to Indigenous culture that exists all across the region. Have a look below and read about the art created by Karma Barnes and contributors from the community and beyond, with soil from the area.


 A beautiful event of collective creativity appeared on Byron foreshore on NAIDOC day last Thursday. An art installation was facilitated by Karma Barnes from Imagine the Land Project the project who was honored to partake in this year's Byron Bay NAIDOC celebrations.


The project worked with Arakwal custodian Delta Kay form the Arakwal Land Council. Over the duration of the day 100 hands worked together to create the beautiful land artwork Carinbah (the traditional Arakwal name for Byron Bay).


Participants ranged from three years of age up to adults who worked together. There was much commentary at the mindful engagement of children as they worked on the artwork. The design came from the imagination of collective collaboration; no preliminary design was set out the artwork just evolved with the essence of the day.


"It is a beautiful thing to see so many people working together, we would like to make a massive thank you to all those who were involved", Karma Barnes. 


The installation was created using gathered natural materials from the Byron Bay region. The Carinbah art installation became a vibrant work representing the geological diversity from the region and its volcanic history. Materials including Red Ochre, charcoal, Bangalow Basalt, Goonengerry Rhyolite and different metamorphic soils from around the region. Often already disturbed sites are chosen to gather materials from so as not to generate any environmental disruption. The artwork is Impermanent and totally biodegradable and now sits weathered by the elements as the pigments return to the environment. 


Imagine The Land Project works to re-establish a connection between people and the environment through art. Through an artistic practice that works within a context of locality and placement. The installation works are based on inspirations of mandala’s and medicine wheels from world cultures. Through working with a palate of natural materials the project engages people in a tactile and grounding experience. The project is coordinated by female artists Karma Barnes (New Zealand/Australia) and Ekarasa Doblanovic (New Zealand/ Croatia) and has been exhibiting since 2009 through out Australia, New Zealand and Colombia.


Imagine the Land has an exciting upcoming project in New Zealand next month and is setting out to create a massive installation from natural earth pigments over a 5-day public art program and educational workshops for regional schools at The Wallace Gallery of Morrinsville. The project is a valuable opportunity for a collaborative art experience in a predominately agricultural rural area, benefiting over 500 children and participants. You can become a supporter of the project by pledging your support on the crowd funding ‘Pledge me” web site. ‘Pledge me” is a new and innovative way that our community can support the arts directly and assist in bringing projects into fruition and in exchange receive an art print of the final artwork.  


The day after the Carinbah art installation was created the rains came, blessing the artwork and igniting the vibrancy of the earth pigments. A small handful of the materials from the installation will be gathered and taken to the next art installation weaving an unseen circle through out the world. 

Additional Images